We’ve all done it. That first presentation we’re asked to pull together, that first workshop or lunch and learn, that first report to the board of directors, that first proposal for a potential client or new employer.
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We get so excited to share our knowledge, to show our expertise, to blow the audience away. We get into this habit of stuffing as much into our presentation as possible. We want to respect our audience’s time and offer them as much content as we can. We want them to walk away with tonnes of information to ensure their time is well-spent, that we’ve offered bucketloads of value. .
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In so doing, however, we risk cognitive overload for our audience. We risk overwhelming them with waaaay to much data, stats, proof, tips, techniques, strategies, facts, figures, formulas, processes, procedures, policies, or whatever else we’re jamming into the time allotted. .
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Resist. Resist. Resist. It’s a mistake. And it’s a mistake commonly made by rookie presenters (or those that get stuck in that ‘rookie’ space). .
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Want to know how we can help you create or modernize your course, curriculum, or presentation so that you don’t overwhelm your audience? Get in touch! We can help. In the interim, download the Rookie Presenters infographic for some quick hits! #linkinbio
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#MondayMusings #presenters #managers #learning #teaching #courses #curriculum #educators #facilitators#leaders #presentationskills #publicspeaking #presenting #morethanpresentationskills #elevateyourawesomeness

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